UNIVERSITY OF ADELAIDE

Thursday 20 November, 2014

Mr TARZIA (Hartley) (17:37): I move:

That this house—

(a) notes that 2014 is the 140th anniversary of the University of Adelaide;

(b) acknowledges the significant achievements of the university, past and present; and

(c) promotes the future of the university as a world-class institution.

Mr TARZIA (Hartley) (17:37): I move:

That this house—

(a) notes that 2014 is the 140th anniversary of the University of Adelaide;

(b) acknowledges the significant achievements of the university, past and present; and

(c) promotes the future of the university as a world-class institution.

Established in 1874, the university is the third oldest in Australia and the first to admit women to academic courses in 1881. It is only the second university in the world to admit women, a reflection of, I suppose you would say, the pioneering social changes that had begun within South Australia and affected the entire nation. In another first, the university became the first in Australia to grant degrees in science.

In addition, obviously it can boast many influential and successful alumni today including Sir William Henry Bragg and his son, William Lawrence Bragg, who won the Nobel Prize in physics in 1915; physiologist Thorburn Brailsford Robertson, who was the first to manufacture insulin using the university's Darling building in 1923; and, some 22 years later, Adelaide Medical School graduate Lord Howard Florey (whom you would have heard of, Deputy Speaker), who was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine with his research partners for the discovery of penicillin and its curative effects—and would you believe that I am allergic to penicillin but it is good for everyone else perhaps.

Members interjecting:

Mr TARZIA: There you go. I can see some members writing that down. The University of Adelaide has even educated a prime minister of Australia (we have to give her that credit), the incumbent President of Singapore, South Australia's first NASA astronaut, an outstanding 107 Rhodes scholars, and it has many other notable alumni including members of both my party room and also the government of the day.

Additionally, it was the university's physics department, led by professor John Carver, who launched Australia's first satellite in conjunction with the Weapons Research Establishment in 1967. It has long encouraged the pioneering spirit, as evidenced by the appointment of Sir Douglas Mawson as lecturer of mineralogy and petrology in 1905, a position he held until 1920, during which time he and his team completed their historic journey and expedition to the South Magnetic Pole.

This motion congratulates the University of Adelaide on what has been, certainly, an exceptional 140 years. It has truly become a world-class institution and I am certain that, as the university moves into the future, it shall remain a leader in its field producing world-class graduates. I also congratulate the newly appointed Chancellor of the University of Adelaide, Rear Admiral Kevin Scarce, and know that he will do a wonderful job.

During my time at the University of Adelaide I was extremely grateful for the affordable education that we get in terms of the tertiary system. I was lucky enough to complete a Bachelor of Laws and a Bachelor of Commerce (Corporate Finance) at the University of Adelaide. Education aside, I can honestly say that I have wonderful memories of my time at Adelaide University, and I thank the university for the education it has provided not only to people in my electorate but also across South Australia. I believe that the South Australian government, and also the opposition, have a role to facilitate education in this state and to ensure that universities make our graduates the best that they can be once they complete their tertiary studies.

A particular of interest of mine is I would like to see the government work closely in partnership with the University of Adelaide in relation to the commercialisation of intellectual property. I think it is fair to say that, whilst we do have some great grassroots stuff happening, unfortunately, we do lose some of that. I would like to see more in that space. But, on the whole, I do note that 2014 is their 140th anniversary. I acknowledge the achievement of the university and commend them, and I will be certainly ensuring that I can do everything I can, and on this side of the chamber we will do whatever we can, to promote the future of the university as a world-class institution for many years to come.

Established in 1874, the university is the third oldest in Australia and the first to admit women to academic courses in 1881. It is only the second university in the world to admit women, a reflection of, I suppose you would say, the pioneering social changes that had begun within South Australia and affected the entire nation. In another first, the university became the first in Australia to grant degrees in science.

In addition, obviously it can boast many influential and successful alumni today including Sir William Henry Bragg and his son, William Lawrence Bragg, who won the Nobel Prize in physics in 1915; physiologist Thorburn Brailsford Robertson, who was the first to manufacture insulin using the university's Darling building in 1923; and, some 22 years later, Adelaide Medical School graduate Lord Howard Florey (whom you would have heard of, Deputy Speaker), who was awarded the Nobel Prize in physiology and medicine with his research partners for the discovery of penicillin and its curative effects—and would you believe that I am allergic to penicillin but it is good for everyone else perhaps.

Members interjecting:

Mr TARZIA: There you go. I can see some members writing that down. The University of Adelaide has even educated a prime minister of Australia (we have to give her that credit), the incumbent President of Singapore, South Australia's first NASA astronaut, an outstanding 107 Rhodes scholars, and it has many other notable alumni including members of both my party room and also the government of the day.

Additionally, it was the university's physics department, led by professor John Carver, who launched Australia's first satellite in conjunction with the Weapons Research Establishment in 1967. It has long encouraged the pioneering spirit, as evidenced by the appointment of Sir Douglas Mawson as lecturer of mineralogy and petrology in 1905, a position he held until 1920, during which time he and his team completed their historic journey and expedition to the South Magnetic Pole.

This motion congratulates the University of Adelaide on what has been, certainly, an exceptional 140 years. It has truly become a world-class institution and I am certain that, as the university moves into the future, it shall remain a leader in its field producing world-class graduates. I also congratulate the newly appointed Chancellor of the University of Adelaide, Rear Admiral Kevin Scarce, and know that he will do a wonderful job.

During my time at the University of Adelaide I was extremely grateful for the affordable education that we get in terms of the tertiary system. I was lucky enough to complete a Bachelor of Laws and a Bachelor of Commerce (Corporate Finance) at the University of Adelaide. Education aside, I can honestly say that I have wonderful memories of my time at Adelaide University, and I thank the university for the education it has provided not only to people in my electorate but also across South Australia. I believe that the South Australian government, and also the opposition, have a role to facilitate education in this state and to ensure that universities make our graduates the best that they can be once they complete their tertiary studies.

A particular of interest of mine is I would like to see the government work closely in partnership with the University of Adelaide in relation to the commercialisation of intellectual property. I think it is fair to say that, whilst we do have some great grassroots stuff happening, unfortunately, we do lose some of that. I would like to see more in that space. But, on the whole, I do note that 2014 is their 140th anniversary. I acknowledge the achievement of the university and commend them, and I will be certainly ensuring that I can do everything I can, and on this side of the chamber we will do whatever we can, to promote the future of the university as a world-class institution for many years to come.