TRANMERE BOWLING AND TENNIS CLUB

Wednesday 11 February, 2015

TARZIA (Hartley) (15:10): I rise today to pay tribute to a wonderful club in my community, the Tranmere Bowling and Tennis Club, which, believe it or not, sir, celebrates its 90th anniversary in 2015. Recently, I had the pleasure of playing at the Tranmere bowling club on Monday evening with the Rotary Club of Campbelltown. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the volunteers of that club, who for 90 years have been the backbone of the club, including the kitchen staff and those who help out on the greens and everywhere else in between.

r TARZIA (Hartley) (15:10): I rise today to pay tribute to a wonderful club in my community, the Tranmere Bowling and Tennis Club, which, believe it or not, sir, celebrates its 90th anniversary in 2015. Recently, I had the pleasure of playing at the Tranmere bowling club on Monday evening with the Rotary Club of Campbelltown. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the volunteers of that club, who for 90 years have been the backbone of the club, including the kitchen staff and those who help out on the greens and everywhere else in between.

I would especially like to thank the management of the club in this the 90th year of its anniversary: namely, the bowls president, Mike Porter; the vice-president, Ann Ellis; the vice-president, Geoff Thomas; the admin secretary, Grace Murphy; treasurer, John Bartram; as well as committee members Ian Abraham, Kathy Day, Bob Gilby, Veronica Dolan, Peter Holland, Tom Lycett, Beverly Cowles and Chris Douglas.

I refer to the Tranmere Times, issue No. 8. It points out that on 31 January the bowling and tennis club celebrated its 90th birthday. The land upon which the club bowls was originally settled in 1838 by David Wylie. He called it Tranmere after his home town in England. The name Tranmere was perpetrated firstly by George Morphett, one of South Australia's leading pioneers, who acquired the property and built the present Tranmere House in 1893.

The SPEAKER: Of course, there are the Tranmere Rovers of the English Football Association.

Mr TARZIA: It could be, sir. I know that that sport is very close to your heart, as it is mine. As I was saying, the name Tranmere was perpetrated firstly by George Morphett, one of SA's leading pioneers, who acquired the property and built the present Tranmere House in 1893, replacing a four-room cottage built in 1838. Pillars on Magill Road can still be seen as the original boundary of one of the earliest houses that were settled there. The grand opening day was 31 January 1925, and it was celebrated with Mrs Treloar rolling the first jack. She could be related to the member, Mr Treloar; I'm sure she may be. Mrs Catt rolled the first bowl. It would have been a very interesting day. Charles Hector Treloar was the founding president of the club, and after his death in 1940 the club championship trophy for the men's singles was named in his honour—the Treloar Cup.

The clubhouse was built and officially opened in December 1928. In 1943 the old croquet lawns were converted into four extra bowling rinks, bringing the total to 14 rinks, making Tranmere the equal largest club in terms of rink numbers at that time, which is a very proud thing. The Tranmere Women's Bowling Club was established in August 1950 and it continued as a separate entity until 1983.

I would like to pay tribute to a couple of players of distinction from this club: Mr John Daire and Dr John Flett. John Daire, I have been told, is actually the longest serving current member of the club. He has been bowling there since 1978. He says that he came to Australia as a ten-pound Pom, having secured a job with the South Australia Police Force before he left. I would like to thank him for his fantastic contribution over the years to the club and also to our great country.

I would also like to pay tribute to Dr John Flett, who is the patron of the club, and many members of the house may be aware of Dr Flett who is the oldest member still playing pennant bowls. As the member next to me has pointed out, he is a local artist as well. In fact, Dr Flett has contributed his paintings to raise funds for the Little Heroes Foundation—a wonderful philanthropist in the world who does great work for the community. I am proud to say that I have one of his paintings hanging up in the Hartley electorate office. I think it is wonderful that we have good community people like Dr John Flett who have given so much to our community.

In summing up, as a state member of parliament I will certainly always do what I can to support our wonderful sporting clubs like the Tranmere bowling club in our area to make sure they are the best they can be.